Morning Glory, Yellowstone National Park Photo by Alex Newby


This year marks the 150th anniversary of Yellowstone National Park, a remarkable milestone of the world's first national park. Before Yellowstone garnered this designation for thousands of years, Native Americans inhabited these lands, using the thermal waters for medicine and spiritual practices. They foraged, hunted, and revered the earth's natural beauty and how it provided for their people.

Indigenous people's perspectives honor this land, and as the Park matures, officials, management, and Tribal leaders are putting forward Indigenous truths and using this milestone anniversary to point toward envisioning and co-creating the future of the Park.

To celebrate this partnership and to begin educating visitors, Mountain Time Arts and Yellowstone National Park have teamed up to bring Yellowstone Revealed to the Park, August 17-28, 2022. A series of place-based projects, Yellowstone Revealed, features an inter-tribal group of Indigenous artists and scholars coming together to pass on the history, stories, and perspectives of the Native people of Yellowstone. The non-invasive, temporary exhibits will demonstrate indigenous people's historical and continued presence in America.

We hope you'll be able to join us for this special milestone.

Lighted teepees by Mountain Time Arts Photo by Jade Snell

Roosevelt Arch, Gardiner, MT


Lighted Teepees: Resiliency of the People by Pretty Shield Foundation and Rocky Mountain Tribal Leaders Council


August 17-28, 2022

Seven teepees will be installed by Roosevelt Arch and lighted nightly at sunset.

 

REMATRIATE by Patti Baldes


August 24-25, 2022, Sunset

Rematriate means a restoration of right relationships aimed not just at righting a past wrong but transforming our collective future. Baldes' project focuses on land rematriation through buffalo restoration. Seven moving buffalo sculptures made of will branches will be brought to life by fourteen dancers and ten drummers.

 

Various Locations Such as Sheep Eaters Cliff, Storm Point, and Obsidian Cliff


ReVisiting the Stories: Indigenous Environmental Stewardship by Dean Nicolai and Tim Ryan


August 23-27, 2022, 9 a.m.- 3 p.m.

A series of interpretive hikes, demonstrations, and storytelling will occur at various Yellowstone locations. Visitors will gain insight into diverse Indigenous knowledge and connection to landscapes. (Space is limited, and reservations are required for these hikes.)

 

Madison Junction


All Nations Teepee Village by Shane Doyle


August 23-27, 2022

Another opportunity to learn more about Indigenous life, twelve teepee lodges, and fifteen teepee rings will signify a new era of Indigenous inclusion and representation in YNP. The spaces represent the twenty-seven affiliated tribal nations of the Yellowstone area. The installation will be brought to life by a community of tribal representatives sharing knowledge with Park visitors, with nightly performances on August 23-25 at 8 p.m.

Teepee Village Photo by Jade Snell